Saving the redwoods with fire mimicry in Oakland, CA

28 10 2018

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Two years ago I began treating these coast redwood trees growing in Oakland, CA using a fire mimicry protocol. Here are the results. The redwoods are showing noticeable improvement in canopy size and density after only two years.

Saving the redwoods isn’t just about keeping them from being cut down. It also requires that we tend them, as the California native people did for thousands of years!

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Valley oak health improved with fire mimicry care

1 10 2018

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Two years ago I treated a number of valley oaks in Alamo, CA using a fire mimicry protocol. Here are photos of the oaks showing their response over the past 2 years. As you can see, there has been a notable improvement in the density and size of the leaf canopies both in 2017 and 2018. However, the photos in 2018 were taken a bit earlier than the original photos, which could explain some of the difference in canopy density.

Or maybe I’m just a Photoshop magician! There is a way to find out . . .

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Fire mimicry reverses decline in coast redwoods

30 09 2018

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As I’ve discussedĀ  previously (here), coast redwoods in many areas are showing symptoms of dieback, typically beginning towards the top and progressing downward. Drought and disease have been implicated in the redwood decline, but the true cause remains elusive. I suspect the decline is ultimately related to the altered fire ecology.

In October 2016 I applied fire mimicry treatments to a grove of coast redwoods in Alamo, CA that were in decline. Here are the results after two years.

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Positive response of valley oaks in Alamo, CA to fire mimicry

23 10 2017

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In the previous post I showed the improvement of several redwoods to fire mimicry treatments at a property in Alamo, CA. Today I would like to share the results with the valley oaks at the same location. In both years the oaks have already dropped some of their leaves with the onset of fall. However, this year the oaks, in all but one case, are holding onto their leaves longer, despite it being one of the driest summers on record.

While most of the results shown in this blog are for coast live oaks, it is important to recognize that many other native species, including valley oaks, redwoods, pines, and toyons are showing positive responses to fire mimicry.

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Sick redwoods in Alamo, CA respond to fire mimicry

19 10 2017

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Last year I was contacted by a home owner in Alamo, California about his distressed valley oaks and redwood trees. Yesterday I checked on the status of the trees and today am reporting on the results with the redwoods. In a followup post I will report on the results with the valley oaks.

The redwoods were treated last October with fire mimicry methods, and in one year have made notable improvement in canopy health and size. The photos here tell theĀ  story far better than I can . . .

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Oaks in Piedmont, CA responding to fire mimicry

22 07 2017

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Two years ago a property owner in Piedmont, CA contacted me about the declining health of their oaks. When I inspected the trees I found a couple of them had stem canker infections (possibly Sudden Oak Death), including the oak pictured above. Most of the oaks were free of infections, but still showed signs of poor health. Now after two treatments using fire mimicry, the oaks, generally, are showing a noticeable improvement in canopy health and density. Note that the photos are not exactly two years apart, but when I re-photograph the oaks again in October I’m betting that the trees will not have lost much, if any, vigor.

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