More results from oaks in Fairfax, CA

30 07 2018

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More results of fire mimicry treatments of coast live oaks in Fairfax, CA after nearly two years. Several of these oaks have stem canker infections, probably Sudden Oak Death. Still . . .

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Four-year results of fire mimicry treatments of oaks in Fairfax, CA

30 07 2018

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Four years ago I began fire mimicry treatments on a grove of coast live oaks in Fairfax, CA. Several of these oaks are infected with stem canker disease, probably Sudden Oak Death. As you can see most of the oaks, as indicated by the size and fullness of their canopies, have responded nicely to the treatments.

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Fire mimicry/canker surgery results with oaks in Fairfax, CA

23 07 2018

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In July of 2016 I began fire mimicry treatments on several coast live oaks in Fairfax, CA. Here are photos showing the response of the oaks after two years. As you can see most of the oaks are showing noticeable improvement in canopy greenness and density.

One of the oaks (Case No. 20160722.4 – see below) had two stem canker infections, probably Sudden Oak Death, that were surgically removed and cauterized in 2016. The last two photos below show the healing of the wounds, both on the same tree. There appears to be no sign of a lingering infection. It’s still too soon to say for sure if the procedure has worked, but the healing results so far are better than expected.

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Fire mimicry results from Mill Valley and Los Altos, CA

8 03 2018

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The first two photo sets above are of an oak in Mill Valley, CA that I began treating 5 years ago using fire mimicry. This oak has made significant improvement, as was already documented two years ago here.

The photo sets below are of three coast live oaks, and two coast redwood trees first treated with fire mimicry last year (2017). The first of the series shows a young coast live oak that has lost some leaf density in its canopy. This is an atypical result which may be corrected with further treatments. The other photos sets show an ancient, Native American-era coast live oak that is showing significant improvement in canopy density in just one year. Another mature coast live oak, despite having a major limb removed, is showing slight improvement. And two coast redwood trees are also showing slight improvement in just one year.

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Long-term response of oaks to fire mimicry

1 12 2017

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Another milestone! For 13 years these coast live oaks have been regularly tended with fire mimicry. These oaks are longest continuous case studies of fire mimicry in my records. Most of the work has been done by Leith Carstarphen following my recommended treatment plan.

Apart from one oak that was lost this past year due to slope failure, the photos (above and below) show significant improvement in the canopy density and vitality of the oaks. The healthy growth of the smaller trees in the foreground now partially obstructs the view of the canopies of two oaks. Still, the oaks continue to grow and thrive, despite the presence of disease (probably Sudden Oak Death) in some of them.

Previous years’ results for these oaks can be found here for 2016, here for 2015, and here for 2014.

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Oaks in Marin respond to fire mimicry

15 09 2017

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Here are the results of an oak grove in Fairfax, CA that has been treated with fire mimicry a couple of times over the past three years. Most of the oaks have responded nicely.

One tree at a time . . .

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Oaks in Fairfax, CA respond to fire mimicry (Part 2)

27 07 2017

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While on my way to check on the oaks in the previous post, I happened upon another client whose oaks I treated with fire mimicry last September. I stopped to say “Hi” and mentioned that I would return in September for the one-year checkup, but he was anxious to see how his oaks were doing yesterday, so I took the time to¬† re-photogrpah his oaks, Here are the results after 10 months . . .

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