Oaks and other trees in Atherton, CA respond to fire mimicry

7 06 2019

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Last year I (and my dedicated crew) treated several coast live oaks along with a valley oak, a California buckeye, a jacaranda, and an ornamental pear with fire mimicry. Yesterday I inspected and re-photographed these trees. Here are the photos showing the results after just one year. I’m happy to report that most of the trees are showing a noticeable increase in canopy density and greenness. BTW, four of the coast live oaks are infected with a stem canker disease, probably Sudden Oak Death. Bet you can’t tell which oaks are infected!

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Oaks in Burlingame, CA respond to fire mimicry

22 04 2019

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Last week I inspected a grove of oaks in Burlingame, CA that I’ve been tending with fire mimicry for five years. Here are recent photos showing their progress . . .

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Fire mimicry results after 7 years in Hillsborough, CA

17 04 2019

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Today I inspected several coast live oaks that I began treating with fire mimicry in 2012. the photos above an below shoe the progress of these oaks over the past 7 years. If you believe that these results are due to the recent wet weather, please scroll down to see results from the drought years.

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Coast live oaks in Woodside, CA show modest response after single fire mimicry treatment

27 11 2018

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Yesterday I visited several coast live oaks in Woodside, CA that had been treated in March 2017 with fire mimicry. After about 1.5 years the oaks are generally showing a modest improvement, mainly in overall canopy greenness and increased density in the lower canopies.

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Diseased coast live oaks in Portola Valley, CA respond to fire mimicry

29 10 2018

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Last year I treated four diseased coast live oaks in Portola Valley using a fire mimicry protocol. Here are the results. Three of the four diseased oaks are showing improvement in canopy greenness and fullness. One treated oak is not showing much change in the last year. Note that the fifth photo in this series is a nearby coast live oak that was not treated. It is showing no noticeable improvement in canopy health.

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Fire mimicry results from Mill Valley and Los Altos, CA

8 03 2018

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The first two photo sets above are of an oak in Mill Valley, CA that I began treating 5 years ago using fire mimicry. This oak has made significant improvement, as was already documented two years ago here.

The photo sets below are of three coast live oaks, and two coast redwood trees first treated with fire mimicry last year (2017). The first of the series shows a young coast live oak that has lost some leaf density in its canopy. This is an atypical result which may be corrected with further treatments. The other photos sets show an ancient, Native American-era coast live oak that is showing significant improvement in canopy density in just one year. Another mature coast live oak, despite having a major limb removed, is showing slight improvement. And two coast redwood trees are also showing slight improvement in just one year.

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Portola Valley oaks respond quickly to fire mimicry

1 03 2018
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Culturally-modified, Native American-era oak showing rapid improvement after fire mimicry.

Last February (2017) I treated and photographed 25 coast live oaks in Portola Valley using fire mimicry practices. A couple days ago I revisited the site and re-photographed the oaks to assess their response. The results show noticeable improvements in the density and greenness of the canopies of most of the treated oaks in just one year. This is becoming a common finding in many of the case studies – that the positive response of the oaks to fire mimicry appears to be rapid.

These results are part of a significant body of evidence showing that oaks and other trees can be brought back to health using fairly simple methods that mimic the effects of fire. If you care to learn more about these methods, please enroll in my upcoming course, “Sudden Oak Life: The Science and Practice of Forest Restoration”.

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