Coast live oaks in Monterey, CA thriving after fire mimicry treatments

2 12 2018

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Today I inspected several sick coast live oaks in Monterey, CA that were treated with fire mimicry one year ago. I’m happy to report that, despite the very dry summer and other factors related to climate change, these sick live oaks are showing clear signs of recover after just one year. Enjoy . . .

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Living with fire: The fire ecology of the Central Coast

28 11 2018

On Thursday, December 6, 2018 I’ll be presenting and discussing the fire ecology of the Central Coast at the Santa Cruz Public Library (224 Church St.) starting at 6:30 pm. Topics will include the California native people’s use of fire in land management, modern fire regimes, fire mimicry, and the role of climate change. For more information on this free event see: https://www.santacruzpl.org/news/permalink/793/

Big Sur 2008 fire





Coast live oaks in Woodside, CA show modest response after single fire mimicry treatment

27 11 2018

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Yesterday I visited several coast live oaks in Woodside, CA that had been treated in March 2017 with fire mimicry. After about 1.5 years the oaks are generally showing a modest improvement, mainly in overall canopy greenness and increased density in the lower canopies.

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A coast live oak and a bigleaf maple . . .

29 10 2018

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The coast live oak above and the bigleaf maple below were treated with fire mimicry last year. I checked on their status recently. Here are the results. Nice to see noticeable improvement in both trees in just a single year!

 

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Diseased coast live oaks in Portola Valley, CA respond to fire mimicry

29 10 2018

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Last year I treated four diseased coast live oaks in Portola Valley using a fire mimicry protocol. Here are the results. Three of the four diseased oaks are showing improvement in canopy greenness and fullness. One treated oak is not showing much change in the last year. Note that the fifth photo in this series is a nearby coast live oak that was not treated. It is showing no noticeable improvement in canopy health.

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Coast live oaks in Piedmont, CA after 3 years of fire mimicry . . .

18 10 2018

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Yesterday I inspected a grove of coast live oaks, some of them Indian-era (pollarded) trees, to assess their response after 3 years of fire mimicry treatments. The photos here show a pretty dramatic increase in canopy greenness and fullness.

Just curious – are the results and information I post here useful to any of you readers? I’m not much of an IT person and would rather focus on working in the woods, but people keep saying that blogs and social media are the best way to share this information. I dunno, I don’t get many visitors to the blog and almost never a comment. Anyone with an opinion on whether or not these results are useful, please feel free to like or comment.

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Sudden Oak Life talk and discussion on October 13, 2018

21 09 2018

For those of you interested in learning more about an ecological vs. pathological approach to Sudden Oak Death, please attend my talk and discussion on Saturday, October 13, 2018, 10 – 12 noon at Lyngso Garden Materials, San Carlos, CA. The talk is free but you must register at:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sudden-oak-life-registration-50423488010

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