One-year fire mimicry results from Kentfield, CA

5 10 2019

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Last year I initiated fire mimicry treatments on a grove of coast live oaks in Kentfield, CA. Here are the results  . . .

Enjoy!

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Five-year results of fire mimicry on oaks in Carmel, CA – Part 2

30 09 2019

Part 2 of this post shows promising results in improving the health of an old coast live oak shown in the preceding post (Part 1) that was severely affected by a stem canker disease, possibly Sudden Oak Death, in 2014. Besides doing fire mimicry treatments I tried (experimentally, as I told the owner) a major surgical procedure that involved removing the infected tissue from the tree. The wound was then strongly cauterized and a mineral-based poultice was applied. One additional surgery to remove lingering infected tissue was done in May 2016. Here are before-and-after photos showing the initial surgical wound immediately after removal of infected tissue, but before cauterization and poultice, and the wound after 5 years.

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While it may not be apparent in the photos, the large wound is showing no sign of lingering infection and it would appear that the disease is eradicated from this critical part of the tree.

At the same time the general health of this oak, as indicated by the foliage density of its canopy, has clearly improved. The following photo shows the canopy density of the two main branches of this oak over the past 5 years. It is too soon to know whether or not this is an exceptional case. But it sure encourages me to try major surgeries on other severely diseased oaks!

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Five-year results of fire mimicry on oaks in Carmel, CA – Part 1

30 09 2019

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Last week I inspected a grove of oaks in Carmel, CA that have received several fire mimicry treatments. While the photos were taken under different light conditions, they do indicate a clear increase in foliage density over the years. However, one oak in this grove was lost earlier this year in a high wind event.

Part 2 of this post will show the results of fire mimicry treatments along with a major stem canker surgery on one of these oaks (see if you can guess which one).

These photos add to mounting evidence that oaks, and many other kinds of trees, need to be tended in order to flourish. As we are now aware, doing nothing is not a viable long-term treatment plan for oaks. See for yourself what can be achieved in just a few years …

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Fire Mimicry Results on Oaks in Pacific Grove, CA

24 09 2019

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Last year I began fire mimicry treatments on 21 oak trees in Pacific Grove, CA. Here are the results after just one year. The light conditions varied between the two years, but the photo comparisons still show a clear increase in canopy density. Enjoy! Read the rest of this entry »





Lovelock Centenary talk by Lee Klinger recorded on July 31, 2019

7 09 2019

Here is my presentation “Indigenous-based forest management: Looking to the past for a way forward” at the recent Lovelock Centenary conference at the University of Exeter, UK

My talk begins at 59:38 and ends at 117:00. Enjoy!

 





Invited talk – “Indigenous-based forest management: Looking to the past for a way forward”

23 07 2019

UPDATE: Here is the video of my talk – https://suddenoaklifeorg.wordpress.com/2019/09/07/lovelock-centenary-talk-by-lee-klinger-recorded-on-july-31-2019/

I am heading to England soon to attend and speak at the Lovelock Centenary (July 29-31), a meeting of Gaian scientists sponsored by the Geological Society of London and the University of Exeter, and inspired by the 100th birthday of James Lovelock, who developed the theory that the earth is a living system (Gaia). James Lovelock will happily be attending and speaking at the conference.

I first met James Lovelock in 1988 at an American Geophysical Union meeting in San Diego, CA hosted by my postdoctoral advisor Stephen Schneider. I presented results that supported Lovelock’s contention that “Gaia likes it cold”, as discussed in Lovelock’s book The Ages of Gaia.

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James Lovelock

After attending the “Gaia in Oxford” meetings in the 1990s I worked with James Lovelock and Susan Canney (University of Oxford) to help found the Gaia Society, which later became the Gaia: Earth System Science specialty group of the Geological Society of London.

My talk at the upcoming meeting will focus on the topic of Applied Gaia, which, as the name implies, is the application of Gaia theory to solving real world problems. I will be speaking on the ways in which indigenous cultures can inform us on how to improve our forest management in California. Dr Susan Canney will follow up with a talk on her successful work applying Gaia theory to elephant conservation in western Africa. The conference program is listed here.

The entire conference will be lived streamed and I encourage you to watch, as there are few chances to see this many Gaian scientists speaking in one setting.

Lovelock Centenary talk final





Fire mimicry effects on oaks in Fairfax, CA

22 07 2019

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Last week I inspected several coast live oaks in Fairfax, CA that have been treated for the past three years with fire mimicry. The photos above and below show the results. The foliage of the oaks appears denser and greener following the treatments. Enjoy!

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