Coast live oaks in Piedmont, CA after 3 years of fire mimicry . . .

18 10 2018

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Yesterday I inspected a grove of coast live oaks, some of them Indian-era (pollarded) trees, to assess their response after 3 years of fire mimicry treatments. The photos here show a pretty dramatic increase in canopy greenness and fullness.

Just curious – are the results and information I post here useful to any of you readers? I’m not much of an IT person and would rather focus on working in the woods, but people keep saying that blogs and social media are the best way to share this information. I dunno, I don’t get many visitors to the blog and almost never a comment. Anyone with an opinion on whether or not these results are useful, please feel free to like or comment.

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Valley oak health improved with fire mimicry care

1 10 2018

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Two years ago I treated a number of valley oaks in Alamo, CA using a fire mimicry protocol. Here are photos of the oaks showing their response over the past 2 years. As you can see, there has been a notable improvement in the density and size of the leaf canopies both in 2017 and 2018. However, the photos in 2018 were taken a bit earlier than the original photos, which could explain some of the difference in canopy density.

Or maybe I’m just a Photoshop magician! There is a way to find out . . .

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Fire mimicry reverses decline in coast redwoods

30 09 2018

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As I’ve discussed  previously (here), coast redwoods in many areas are showing symptoms of dieback, typically beginning towards the top and progressing downward. Drought and disease have been implicated in the redwood decline, but the true cause remains elusive. I suspect the decline is ultimately related to the altered fire ecology.

In October 2016 I applied fire mimicry treatments to a grove of coast redwoods in Alamo, CA that were in decline. Here are the results after two years.

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Sudden Oak Life talk and discussion on October 13, 2018

21 09 2018

For those of you interested in learning more about an ecological vs. pathological approach to Sudden Oak Death, please attend my talk and discussion on Saturday, October 13, 2018, 10 – 12 noon at Lyngso Garden Materials, San Carlos, CA. The talk is free but you must register at:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sudden-oak-life-registration-50423488010

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More results from oaks in Fairfax, CA

30 07 2018

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More results of fire mimicry treatments of coast live oaks in Fairfax, CA after nearly two years. Several of these oaks have stem canker infections, probably Sudden Oak Death. Still . . .

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Four-year results of fire mimicry treatments of oaks in Fairfax, CA

30 07 2018

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Four years ago I began fire mimicry treatments on a grove of coast live oaks in Fairfax, CA. Several of these oaks are infected with stem canker disease, probably Sudden Oak Death. As you can see most of the oaks, as indicated by the size and fullness of their canopies, have responded nicely to the treatments.

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Fire mimicry/canker surgery results with oaks in Fairfax, CA

23 07 2018

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In July of 2016 I began fire mimicry treatments on several coast live oaks in Fairfax, CA. Here are photos showing the response of the oaks after two years. As you can see most of the oaks are showing noticeable improvement in canopy greenness and density.

One of the oaks (Case No. 20160722.4 – see below) had two stem canker infections, probably Sudden Oak Death, that were surgically removed and cauterized in 2016. The last two photos below show the healing of the wounds, both on the same tree. There appears to be no sign of a lingering infection. It’s still too soon to say for sure if the procedure has worked, but the healing results so far are better than expected.

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